Onich Tartan
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MacInnes Clan Tartan (TS1464)

Reference Tartans of Scotland and The Scottish Register of Tartans


Recorded by Adam in 1908. The Clan MacInnes of the West and the Clan Innes of Moray are two separate clans. The similarity in the structure of the MacInnes green tartan and the Innes red have resulted in the use of both tartans as 'dress' and 'hunting' tartans by both clans. The notes in the archives of the Scottish Tartans Society attribute the design to the 'Onich Grocer' with no further explanation. MacInneses are hereditary bowmen to the Chief of MacKinnon.

The source of tartan 1464 was: Dgn. 'Onich Grocer'

This tartan appears as the "Modern Hunting" in several different colors of blue, red and yellow, and also as the "Ancient Hunting" with lighter or muted colors. But the Sett, thread count and colors are the same.


From the Clann Aonghais, Scottish Newsletter of the Clan MacInnes Society; Issue Number 1 November, 1998:

John MacInnes of Onich who was born around 1851. He was Registar for Ballachulish and Corran of Ardgour between the years 1874 and 1920. John was also a tailor and weaver and ran a general merchant stores all in the same premsies as his Registar Office. His loom and workshop were to the rear of the building. When Edward the Seventh was the Prince of Wales he called at John's "Nether Lochaber Stores" to have an outfit made. It is said that the royal patronage went to John's head to the disdain of his neighbours. The building where the first green hunting MacInnes tartan was woven still stands and skirts the main road between North Ballachulish and Fort William and is located near the Corran Ferry. - Researched by Alasdair "MacInnes"Campbell, Fort Willaim.

From the The Scottish Register of Tartans:

Registration notes: Threadcount recorded by William McInnes in the Public Register of all Arms and Bearings in Scotland, 44/73, 15 November 1960. The Scottish Tartans Society notes for this tartan attribute the design to the 'Onich Grocer' with no further explanation. Further research by Alasdair 'MacInnes' Campbell of Fort William has identified John MacInnes of Onich, who was born around 1851 and was Registrar for Ballachulish and Corran of Ardgour 1874-1920. John MacInnes was also a tailor and weaver and ran a general merchant store from the same premises as his Registry Office. It is said that when King Edward VII was the Prince of Wales he called at John's 'Nether Lochaber Stores' to have an outfit made. It is said that the royal patronage went to John's head - to the disdain of his neighbours.

Threadcount:
R4G12B24K6A6K6G32K4G4K4G4K24Y4

Pallet:
A=5C8CA8AZURE;K=101010BLACK;B=2C2C80BLUE;G=285800GREEN;R=C80000RED;Y=E8C000YELLOW;

Threadcount given over a half sett with full count at the pivots.

The threadcount is usually provided as a series of capital letters and numbers. Each capital letter represents a colour in the tartan and the number beside eachletter dictates the precise number of threads required so that the weaver can set up the loom accurately. For example

B24 W4 B24 R2 K24 G24 W2

Means 24 threads of B (blue) followed by 4 threads of W (white), 24 threads of B (blue), 2 threads of R (red), 24 threads of K (black), 24 threads of G (green), and another 2 threads of W (white).

Tartans are either symmetrical/reflective patterns or asymmetrical/repeating patterns. The threadcounts for these two types of patterns are presented slightly differently so that the weaver knows which type of pattern he is setting up on his loom.

Another variation of the tartan known as a "colorway".
Tartan jpeg courtesy of Linda Clifford, please do not copy without permission.

 

Reference: Linda Clifford email January 6, 2001